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How do I add local jar files (not yet part of the Maven repository) directly in my project's library sources?

Install the JAR into your local Maven repository as follows:

mvn install:install-file \
   -Dfile=<path-to-file> \
   -DgroupId=<group-id> \
   -DartifactId=<artifact-id> \
   -Dversion=<version> \
   -Dpackaging=<packaging> \
   -DgeneratePom=true

Where each refers to:

<path-to-file>: the path to the file to load e.g → c:\kaptcha-2.3.jar

<group-id>: the group that the file should be registered under e.g → com.google.code

<artifact-id>: the artifact name for the file e.g → kaptcha

<version>: the version of the file e.g → 2.3

<packaging>: the packaging of the file e.g. → jar

Reference

You can add local dependencies directly (as mentioned in build maven project with propriatery libraries included) like this:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.sample</groupId>
    <artifactId>sample</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
    <scope>system</scope>
    <systemPath>${project.basedir}/src/main/resources/Name_Your_JAR.jar</systemPath>
</dependency>

Update

In new releases this feature is marked as deprecated but still working and not removed yet ( You just see warning in the log during maven start). An issue is raised at maven group about this https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/MNG-6523 ( You can participate and describe why this feature is helpful in some cases). I hope this feature remains there!

If you are asking me, as long as the feature is not removed, I use this to make dependency to only one naughty jar file in my project which is not fit in repository. If this feature is removed, well, there are lots of good answers here which I can chose from later!

Firstly, I would like to give credit for this answer to an anonymous Stack Overflow user - I am pretty sure I've seen a similar answer here before - but now I cannot find it.

The best option for having local JAR files as a dependency is to create a local Maven repository. Such a repository is nothing more than a proper directory structure with pom files in it.

For my example: I have my master project on ${master_project} location and subproject1 is on ${master_project}/${subproject1}.

Then I create a Maven repository in: ${master_project}/local-maven-repo.

In the pom file in subproject1 located at ${master_project}/${subproject1}/pom.xml, the repository needs to be specified which would take file path as a URL parameter:

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>local-maven-repo</id>
        <url>file:///${project.parent.basedir}/local-maven-repo</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

The dependency can be specified as for any other repository. This makes your pom repository independent. For instance, once the desired JAR is available in Maven central, you just need to delete it from your local repo and it will be pulled from the default repo.

    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.apache.felix</groupId>
        <artifactId>org.apache.felix.servicebinder</artifactId>
        <version>0.9.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    </dependency>

The last but not least thing to do is to add the JAR file to local repository using -DlocalRepositoryPath switch like so:

mvn org.apache.maven.plugins:maven-install-plugin:2.5.2:install-file  \
    -Dfile=/some/path/on/my/local/filesystem/felix/servicebinder/target/org.apache.felix.servicebinder-0.9.0-SNAPSHOT.jar \
    -DgroupId=org.apache.felix -DartifactId=org.apache.felix.servicebinder \
    -Dversion=0.9.0-SNAPSHOT -Dpackaging=jar \
    -DlocalRepositoryPath=${master_project}/local-maven-repo

Once the JAR file is installed, your Maven repo can be committed to a code repository, and the whole set-up is system independent. (Working example in GitHub).

I agree that having JARs committed to source code repo is not a good practice, but in real life, quick and dirty solutions are sometimes better than a full blown Nexus repo to host one JAR that you cannot publish.

Create a new folder, let's say local-maven-repo at the root of your Maven project.

Just add a local repo inside your <project> of your pom.xml:

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>local-maven-repo</id>
        <url>file:///${project.basedir}/local-maven-repo</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

Then for each external jar you want to install, go at the root of your project and execute:

mvn deploy:deploy-file -DgroupId=[GROUP] -DartifactId=[ARTIFACT] -Dversion=[VERS] -Durl=file:./local-maven-repo/ -DrepositoryId=local-maven-repo -DupdateReleaseInfo=true -Dfile=[FILE_PATH]

I'd like such solution - use maven-install-plugin in pom file:

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-install-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>2.5.2</version>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <phase>initialize</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>install-file</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <file>lib/yourJar.jar</file>
                <groupId>com.somegroup.id</groupId>
                <artifactId>artefact-id</artifactId>
                <version>x.y.z</version>
                <packaging>jar</packaging>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

In this case you can perform mvn initialize and jar will be installed in local maven repo. Now this jar is available during any maven step on this machine (do not forget to include this dependency as any other maven dependency in pom with <dependency></dependency> tag). It is also possible to bind jar install not to initialize step, but any other step you like.

<dependency>
    <groupId>group id name</groupId>
    <artifactId>artifact name</artifactId>
    <version>version number</version>
    <scope>system</scope>
    <systemPath>jar location</systemPath>
</dependency>

Yes , you can have but its not good idea.

Instead install all these jars to maven repos

Also See

Add your own local JAR in POM file and use that in maven build.

mvn install:install-file -Dfile=path-to-jar -DgroupId=owngroupid -DartifactId=ownartifactid -Dversion=ownversion -Dpackaging=jar

For example:

mvn install:install-file -Dfile=path-to-jar -DgroupId=com.decompiler -DartifactId=jd-core-java -Dversion=1.2 -Dpackaging=jar

Then add it to the POM like this:

enter image description here

The really quick and dirty way is to point to a local file:

<dependency>
      <groupId>sample</groupId>  
       <artifactId>com.sample</artifactId>  
       <version>1.0</version> 
      <scope>system</scope>
      <systemPath>C:\DEV\myfunnylib\yourJar.jar</systemPath>
</dependency>

However this will only live on your machine (obviously), for sharing it usually makes sense to use a proper m2 archive (nexus/artifactory) or if you do not have any of these or don't want to set one up a local maven structured archive and configure a "repository" in your pom: local:

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>my-local-repo</id>
        <url>file://C:/DEV//mymvnrepo</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

remote:

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>my-remote-repo</id>
        <url>http://192.168.0.1/whatever/mavenserver/youwant/repo</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

for this a relative path is also possible using the basedir variable:

<url>file:${basedir}</url>

One way is to upload it to your own Maven repository manager (such as Nexus). It's good practice to have an own repository manager anyway.

Another nice way I've recently seen is to include the Maven Install Plugin in your build lifecycle: You declare in the POM to install the files to the local repository. It's a little but small overhead and no manual step involved.

http://maven.apache.org/plugins/maven-install-plugin/install-file-mojo.html

Of course you can add jars to that folder. But maybe it does not what you want to achieve...

If you need these jars for compilation, check this related question: Can I add jars to maven 2 build classpath without installing them?

Also, before anyone suggests it, do NOT use the system scope.

Another interesting case is when you want to have in your project private maven jars. You may want to keep the capabilities of Maven to resolve transitive dependencies. The solution is fairly easy.

  1. Create a folder libs in your project
  2. Add the following lines in your pom.xml file

    <properties><local.repository.folder>${pom.basedir}/libs/</local.repository.folder>
    </properties>
    
    <repositories>
       <repository>
            <id>local-maven-repository</id>
            <url>file://${local.repository.folder}</url>
            <releases>
                <enabled>true</enabled>
            </releases>
            <snapshots>
                <enabled>true</enabled>
            </snapshots>
       </repository>
    </repositories>
    
  3. Open the .m2/repository folder and copy the directory structure of the project you want to import into the libs folder.

E.g. suppose you want to import the dependency

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.mycompany.myproject</groupId>
    <artifactId>myproject</artifactId>
    <version>1.2.3</version>
</dependency>

Just go on .m2/repository and you will see the following folder

com/mycompany/myproject/1.2.3

Copy everything in your libs folder (again, including the folders under .m2/repository) and you are done.

command line :

mvn install:install-file -Dfile=c:\kaptcha-{version}.jar -DgroupId=com.google.code
-DartifactId=kaptcha -Dversion={version} -Dpackaging=jar

I think a better solution for this problem is to use maven-install-plugin to automatically install the files at install time. This is how I set it up for my project.

First, add the path (where you store the local .jars) as a property.

<properties>
    <local.sdk>/path/to/jar</local.sdk>
</properties>

Then, under plugins add a plugin to install the jars when compiling.

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-install-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>2.5.2</version>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <id>1</id>
            <phase>initialize</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>install-file</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <groupId>com.local.jar</groupId> 
                <artifactId>appengine-api</artifactId>
                <version>1.0</version>
                <packaging>jar</packaging>
                <file>${local.sdk}/lib/impl/appengine-api.jar</file>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
        <execution>
            <id>appengine-api-stubs</id>
            <phase>initialize</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>install-file</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <groupId>com.local.jar</groupId>
                <artifactId>appengine-api-stubs</artifactId>
                <version>1.0</version>
                <packaging>jar</packaging>
                <file>${local.sdk}/lib/impl/appengine-api-stubs.jar</file>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

Finally, in dependencies, you can add the jars

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.local.jar</groupId>
    <artifactId>appengine-api</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
</dependency>

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.local.jar</groupId>
    <artifactId>appengine-api-stubs</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
    <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>

By Setting up your project like this, the project will continue to build even when you take it to another computer (given that it has all the jar files in the path specified by the property local.sdk).

For groupId use a unique name just to make sure that there are no conflicts.

Now when you mvn install or mvn test local jars will be added automatically.

The preferred way would be to create your own remote repository.

See here for details on how to do it. Have a look at the 'Uploading to a Remote Repository' section.

I want to share a code where you can upload a folder full of jars. It's useful when a provider doesn't have a public repository and you need to add lots of libraries manually. I've decided to build a .bat instead of call directly to maven because It could be Out of Memory errors. It was prepared for a windows environment but is easy to adapt it to linux OS:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.PrintWriter;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.jar.Attributes;
import java.util.jar.JarFile;
import java.util.jar.Manifest;

public class CreateMavenRepoApp {

    private static final String OCB_PLUGIN_FOLDER = "C://your_folder_with_jars";

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

    File directory = new File();
    //get all the files from a directory
    PrintWriter writer = new PrintWriter("update_repo_maven.bat", "UTF-8");
    writer.println("rem "+ new Date());  
    File[] fList = directory.listFiles();
    for (File file : fList){
        if (file.isFile()){               
        String absolutePath = file.getAbsolutePath() ;
        Manifest  m = new JarFile(absolutePath).getManifest();
        Attributes attributes = m.getMainAttributes();
        String symbolicName = attributes.getValue("Bundle-SymbolicName");

        if(symbolicName!=null &&symbolicName.contains("com.yourCompany.yourProject")) {
            String[] parts =symbolicName.split("\\.");
            String artifactId = parts[parts.length-1];
            String groupId = symbolicName.substring(0,symbolicName.length()-artifactId.length()-1);
            String version = attributes.getValue("Bundle-Version");
            String mavenLine= "call mvn org.apache.maven.plugins:maven-install-plugin:2.5.1:install-file -Dfile="+ absolutePath+" -DgroupId="+ groupId+" -DartifactId="+ artifactId+" -Dversion="+ version+" -Dpackaging=jar ";
            writer.println(mavenLine);          
        }

        }
    }
    writer.close();
    }

}

After run this main from any IDE, run the update_repo_maven.bat.

This is a short syntax for newer versions:

mvn install:install-file -Dfile=<path-to-file>

It works when the JAR was built by Apache Maven - the most common case. Then it'll contain a pom.xml in a subfolder of the META-INF directory, which will be read by default.

Source: http://maven.apache.org/guides/mini/guide-3rd-party-jars-local.html

Also take a look at...

<scope>compile</scope>

Maven Dependencies. This is the default but I've found in some cases explicitly setting that scope also Maven to find local libraries in the local repository.

For some reason, in the web application I'm giving maintenance to, neither Alireza Fattahi's solution nor JJ Roman's solution worked correctly. In both cases, the compilation goes okay (it sees the jar), but the packaging fails to include the jar inside the war.

The only way I managed to make it work was by putting the jar on /src/main/webapp/WEB-INF/lib/ and then combining it with either Fattahis's or Roman's solution.

Note that it is NOT necessarily a good idea to use a local repo. If this project is shared with others then everyone else will have problems and questions when it doesn't work, and the jar won't be available even in your source control system!

Although the shared repo is the best answer, if you cannot do this for some reason then embedding the jar is better than a local repo. Local-only repo contents can cause lots of problems, especially over time.

On your local repository you can install your jar by issuing the commands

 mvn install:install-file -Dfile=<path-to-file> -DgroupId=<group-id> \
-DartifactId=<artifact-id> -Dversion=<version> -Dpackaging=<packaging>

Follow this useful link to do the same from mkyoung's website. You can also check maven guide for the same

To install third party jar, Please call the command like below

mvn install:install-file -DgroupId= -DartifactId= -Dversion= -Dpackaging=jar -Dfile=path
  1. mvn install

You can write code below in command line or if you're using eclipse builtin maven right click on project -> Run As -> run configurations... -> in left panel right click on Maven Build -> new configuration -> write the code in Goals & in base directory :${project_loc:NameOfYourProject} -> Run

mvn install:install-file
   -Dfile=<path-to-file>
   -DgroupId=<group-id>
   -DartifactId=<artifact-id>
   -Dversion=<version>
   -Dpackaging=<packaging>
   -DgeneratePom=true

Where each refers to:

< path-to-file >: the path to the file to load e.g -> c:\kaptcha-2.3.jar

< group-id >: the group that the file should be registered under e.g -> com.google.code

< artifact-id >: the artifact name for the file e.g -> kaptcha

< version >: the version of the file e.g -> 2.3

< packaging >: the packaging of the file e.g. -> jar

2.After installed, just declares jar in pom.xml.

 <dependency>
      <groupId>com.google.code</groupId>
      <artifactId>kaptcha</artifactId>
      <version>2.3</version>
 </dependency>

Important part in dependency is: ${pom.basedir} (instead of just ${basedir})

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.example</groupId>
    <artifactId>example</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
    <scope>system</scope>
    <systemPath>${pom.basedir}/src/lib/example.jar</systemPath>
</dependency>

I had the same error for a set of dependencies in my pom.xml turns out the versions of the dependencies was not specified in the pom.xml and was mentioned in the parent repository. For some reason the version details was not syncing with this repo. Hence i manually entered the versions using the tag and it worked like a charm. Little bit of time needed to look up the versions in the parent and specify here. But this can be done just for the jars that are showing the artifactid error and it works. Hope this helps someone.

In Apache Maven 3.5.4, I had to add double quotation. Without double quotation it wasn't worked for me.

example: mvn install:install-file "-Dfile=location to the jar file" "-DgroupId=group id" "-DartifactId=artifact id" "-Dversion=version" "-Dpackaging=package type"

THIS ANSWER IS ONLY FOR ECLIPSE USERS:

If you are using Eclipse, place the jar in lib/, right click on the jar name and click "add to build path". Eclipse will create a "referenced libraries" and place the jar for you

It resolved the import of the jar right away in the program for me

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